Posted by: A Part of the Solution | November 22, 2013

Raspberry Ginger Coulis

As you read, you’ll find my raspberry ginger coulis is no such thing.  Strictly speaking, a ‘coulis’ is a liquid as close to its original fruit or vegetable nature as possible, ie raw or nearly. This sauce is cooked, twice, and thickened; therefore my coulis is no coulis. But I like the way raspberry ginger coulis sounds. And I love how fresh the sauce tastes. And I’ve just always called it a coulis since I started putting it together long, long years ago.

Good things to do with raspberry ginger coulis: pour it over waffles or pancakes; pour it over ice cream; pour it over pound cake and ice cream, or angel-food cake (with or without ice cream); thicken it more and use it as a filling for gingersnap sandwich cookies, or homemade mini poptarts or layer cake (orange or chocolate would be the perfect foils here). So head to the freezer section and grab your raspberries. This coulis will keep ten days (as far as we can reckon without ever having had it on hand that long…).

Check it out, this is vegan and gluten-free–so  invite everyone over to enjoy some. You’ll find alternate fruit coulis selections below the template recipe.

Raspberry Ginger Coulis

makes about 2 cups

2 bags, 24 oz, frozen raspberries, because they’re less expensive and available year-round

2 inches, 5 cm, ginger root, sliced very thinly or chopped fine–but not micro-planed

1/2 cup, 4 oz, water

zest of 1/3 an orange, pared thinly from the fruit–don’t use the micro-plane this time or the zest will steep too long in the coulis and overpower the finished product (ask me how I know)

juice of 1 orange

2/3 cup, 5 oz, sugar

pinch of salt

1 TBSP cornstarch dissolved to a fine slurry in 2 TBSP water (for sauce, for filling, us 2 TBSP cornstarch)

2 TBSP Grand Marnier, or other orange liqueur [optional]

1 TBSP unsalted butter [optional]

In a two or three quart heavy-bottomed sauce pan, bring the first seven ingredients to a boil, stirring occasionally. Allow to boil briskly, without foaming over on a medium flame, until the raspberries are completely broken down. Remove from the heat. If you have a food mill, using the plate with the smallest holes, push the hot fruit mass through until only a small, compact wad of seeds are left. Without a food mill, you will need a good sieve, a wooden spoon, and a commitment to your upper-body workout. Push the fruit mass manually through the sieve-working longer than you think you should have to to get all your lovely raspberry glop fully separated from the seeds.

In a clean heavy bottomed pan, bring your raspberry syrup back to a boil. Whisk  in the cornstarch over medium low heat. Switch to gently stirring for the next minutel. Allow the coulis to cook for five minutes until thicker, glossy and very clear–stirring carefully and thoroughly, but not speedily–as you don’t want to ‘break’ the cornstarch.

Off the heat, stir in the liqueur (if using) and the knob of butter (if using).

This is good hot, warm or cold. It stores in the fridge for (an estimated) ten days. If you wish to reheat the  coulis, take care not to boil it, or the cornstarch thickening will break.

Blueberry Lemon Coulis

makes about two and a half cups

2 bags of frozen blueberries

Zest of one lemon, pared in fine strips

Juice of one lemon

1/2 cup, 4 oz, water

1/2 cup, 3.5 oz, sugar

pinch of salt

1 TBSP cornstarch dissolved to a fine slurry in 2 TBSP water (for sauce, for filling, us 2 TBSP cornstarch)

2 TBSP Limoncello, or other lemon liqueur [optional]

1 TBSP unsalted butter [optional]

Proceed as above.

Strawberry Black Pepper Basil Coulis

makes about two and a half cups

2 bags frozen strawberries

1 tsp whole black peppercorns

1/2 cup, 4 oz, water

1/2 cup, 3.5 oz, sugar

pinch of salt

12 basil leaves, chiffonade these

1 TBSP cornstarch dissolved to a fine slurry in 2 TBSP water (for sauce, for filling, us 2 TBSP cornstarch)

2 TBSP Benedictine, or other herbal liqueur [optional]

1 TBSP unsalted butter [optional]

Proceed as above. Add the basil leaves just before stirring in the cornstarch slurry. Strain this sauce when you remove it from the heat to leave it clear, but savoring of basil.

Pineapple Jalapeno Coulis

makes about two and a half cups

24 oz fresh pineapple chunks, or the 2 bags of frozen

3 Jalapeno peppers, seeded and ribbed if you want a ‘mild’ finish, the more seed-and-rib you leave in, the hotter your finished product

1/2 cup, 4 oz, water

1/2 cup, 3.5 oz, sugar

pinch of salt

1 TBSP cornstarch dissolved to a fine slurry in 2 TBSP water (for sauce, for filling, us 2 TBSP cornstarch)

2 TBSP dark rum or good tequila [optional]

1 TBSP unsalted butter [optional]

Proceed as above.

 

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